Taliban have issued new laws in province of Takhar

Image

KABUL: Civil society activists in Afghanistan's northeastern province of Takhar have claimed on Thursday that the Taliban have issued new laws and regulations in recently captured districts in the province. Foreign media reported that the development comes after the Taliban intensified attacks on district centers in a number of provinces in the past few weeks. On Thursday the group seized Tagab district in Kapisa province, sources said.

The activists said the Taliban have ordered men to grow their beards, banned women from leaving home alone, and have set dowry regulations for girls.

“They urged women in a statement to not leave home without a male relative,” said Merajuddin Sharifi, a civil society activist in Takhar.

Sharifi added that the “Taliban insist on trials without evidence.”

Members of Takhar provincial council said food prices have increased substantially in areas that have fallen to the Taliban.

“People are facing problems there; services are nonexistent, clinics, and schools are closed,” said Mohammad Azam Afzali, a member of the Takhar provincial council.

Takhar governor meanwhile said that government buildings have been destroyed by the Taliban and services have been stopped in areas controlled by Taliban.

“They (Taliban) looted everything, and no services exist,” said Abdullah Qarluq, governor of Takhar.

Activists in the province said the continuation of the situation is not acceptable, and clearing operations should be launched against the group.

The Taliban rejected the claims and said it is propaganda against the group. This comes as clashes between Taliban and ANDSF intensified in Herat, Kapisa, Takhar, Balkh, Parwan and Baghlan provinces.

You May Also Like

Image

US dollar crossed the Rs175 mark

The US dollar on Tuesday crossed the Rs175 mark

Image

Price of a tola of gold increase of over Rs4,200

The price of a tola of gold witnessed

Image

Why is the world watching us die in silence?: Afghan Women activists

Women activists in Kabul held up signs